Horizons

Horizons

The horizon is the apparent line that divides the earth and the sky. The word derives from the Greek expression ὁρίζων κύκλος (horizōn kyklos, separating circle). Throughout history the horizon has had great importance. In a practical sense it was the limit of communication and vision before radio and telegraph were invented. In navigation, both at sea and in the air, it plays an important role even today. However, the horizon is a concept that derives from our perception of the earth and the sky. It’s both objective and subjective. It’s so objective that you can navigate using it and you will arrive a your destination. You can even measure it’s distance. It’s much closer than our „endless“ perception of it. The distance depends on where you stand: Standing at ground level, the horizon is 4.7 km away if you’re 1.70 m tall or 5 km away if you’re 2 m tall. It can be hundreds of kilometers away if you’re observing it from high buildings or mountains. And if you were a 2 cm tall insect, your horizon would be 500 m away from you if the globe’s surface were perfectly flat. Even if the world were flat and not a sphere, if we were standing on a perfectly flat and endless surface floating in the universe, theoretically we could see endlessly. And then, still, there would be a horizon: the line dividing the perfectly flat endless surface from the stars above. Even though you can measure horizon’s distance and extension, you can never touch it. It’s something that exists only relatively far away from you. It’s never within your arm’s reach. In fact, horizons don’t really exist. We can measure them, observe them, but they just appear to exist. That’s for the „outside“, material horizons. On the emotional level, looking at the horizon, not knowing what there is, and what lies beyond, evokes a multitude of feelings: curiosity, longing, feelings of adventure, being lost without a point of reference, the fulfillment of our dreams in a distant place, the escape from our unsatisfactory lives, and endless other feelings. Then there is the mind’s horizon, which does not depend on physical circumstances. Let’s assume you are looking at one of the photographs in this exhibition. What you are really looking at is a photographic paper with pigments on it that resemble something that was photographed in nature. But within your mind, you transcend the photographic paper and the pigments. You „see“ an image of a horizon. If you know where it was photographed, you will think whether you’ve been there yourself and try remember your experience of that place. Without any intention, your mind will have an impression of that image, judge it, grade it, categorize it. Instantly your mental horizon is extended beyond your physical space, you break through the limits of the building and of the space and time you are currently in. Our mental horizon is limitless; it’s capacity to transcend the obvious and imagine what lies beyond is limitless. Both the physical, geographical and the mental horizons exist and at the same time they are just appearances. When you measure the geographical horizon’s distance from you, you are measuring an appearance, something that doesn’t exist. The mind’s horizon equally feels real, your imagination and your memories, past experiences that project into the present and future, the known projecting into the unknown. Still, that horizon doesn’t really exist. Horizons exist and don’t exist, depending how you look at it. It can be close and far, present but intangible, physical yet imaginative. Photographs of the visible horizon have a lot to do with the metal horizon. Look and experience for yourself.

Chiemsee Horizon  

Chiemsee  

Chiemsee  

Bavaria  

Mediterranean Sea, Italy  

Mediterranean Sea, Italy  

Atlantic Ocean, Peniche, Portugal  

North Sea, Germany